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Button in Utilities to Install Webroot Filtering Extension manually

  • 1 January 2020
  • 14 replies
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Userlevel 3
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Problem: Latest Windows 10 versions dont always allow install of the Webroot Filtering Extension, and newer versions of Chrome dont allow it. A user or IT admin may also manuallly uninstall the Webroot Filtering Extension in Chrome.

Soution: If a user or IT admin wants to reinstall/freshinstall the extension there should be a button called “Install Webroot Filtering  on Browser” under Utilities in Webroot SecureAnywhere - that forces an install. If it doesnt succeed then the button should also reveal and direct URL link to install it via the browser address bar. 

Where to implement the solution: 

  1. Webroot SecureAnywhere software but also on the online Console. 
  2. Under Utlities tab or under the PC Security tab (on the right side o the software) and somewhere on the website console as well. 
  3. Add button called “Install Webroot Filtering on Browser”
  4. Then the button then reveals a dropdown menu for: Chrome, Edge, Mozilla, Safari
  5. It then tries to install the extension or plugin for the relevant browser. You have to confirm in Webroot that its done. If not thenyou tick a tickbox that says “Didnt install” and gives you the direct URL or instructions to install it. 

 


14 replies

Userlevel 7
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@meservo,

 

I’m not a fan of Webroot’s Filtering Extension, however everyone is entitled to their own opinions. You’ve obviously put some detailed thought into this and I can respect that. Your idea has great potential for you and anyone who uses the extension.

 

Just so you know, I know Webroot hasn’t been able to get the Command function to work from the GSM Console for over 6 months. I believe the type of function you’re asking for would need that to work. If I’m correct, I wouldn’t expect it anytime soon. I’ve been on the list of people who get notified about updates on this bug for over 2 months and I haven’t heard anything. I hope I’m wrong, but just thought you should know.

 

@freydrew, should this idea be in the Business Idea forum?

 

Sincerely,

NicCrockett

Userlevel 3
Badge +7

Average non technical user is not very clueless on what they click online. Having a whole manual Instagram of the filtering plugin or extension for those I deem as a Cybersecurity professional as useful would be good for me to use. I would also like to see automation switches so that I can use command line to remotely install the plugins in specific browsers through scripts that I deploy to endpoints.  Webroot staff said that the filtering extension on Chrome is pretty good on resources. The Edge browser will start using chromium engine we can then get Webroot to recreate same filtering extension out to edge plugin market.

Im curious as to why you are not a fan of  cyber Intelligence. I think viewers access to intelligence is also a great training tool to understand the  aspects that help visually see which site looks safe as well.

One thing the extension is missing is the ability to submit a dangerous site once in it and the ability for others to peer review. The power of a crowd.

 

Userlevel 3
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Thanks for sharing another angle

Userlevel 7
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@meservo,

 

I know there are some command line options when installing Webroot on Windows. However, I don’t know all of them and I don’t know if there are any that control the Webroot Filtering Extension. You might be able to find these in the help documentation or support might be able to give you ones that aren’t in the help documentation. You have to be logged into the local PC and use a Command Prompt with Admin Rights. I know this isn’t deployed remotely, but it’s something. Here’s an example that I know:

Uninstall Webroot: "C:\Program Files\Webroot\WRSA.exe" -uninstall (this may need to be adjusted if the install location is different)

 

I do believe in Cybersecurity, but I also believe in PCs being able to function too. The Webroot Filtering Extension brought our PCs to a crawl. Plus, it put so many things on a search page that it was confusing and annoying to users. So, I believe in Cybersecurity paired with functioning systems and proper user training. I scare my employees every so often by mentioning something I saw happening on their PC. A little fear goes a long way. :wink:

 

Sincerely,

NicCrockett

Userlevel 3
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Ive just learned there is an Edge Extension equivalent that is pushed out for Edge but it also didn't install properly.

 

The filtering is part of their marketing, so I should think they need to make access to installing it manually and automatically more uniform across major browsers.

Userlevel 7

Go to the Microsoft Store using Edge or even the new Edge Beta built on Chromium: https://microsoftedge.microsoft.com/addons/detail/fmkaflbamgddpjacdmjlkhbnpnlemaea

Userlevel 7

And go to the Chrome Store to get it within Chrome: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/webroot-filtering-extensi/ihepcfbmkcalpfhoeaaodembpppbaboh

Userlevel 3
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@TripleHelix ok thats obviously a super manual way. But how do you effectively communicate the links to Webroot filtering extensions easily to millions of users? A button seems a no brainer. Remember the chrome Webroot extension is not available in Chrome Web Store. Its a privately published extension.

Too much manuality for reinstalling extensions.. There should be no need to scour the net for an answer. Intuitiveness. 

Developers should also keep working on addressing automation issues with the extension. I had to setup a manual Group Policy entry once to force it.

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@NicCrockett

How old were the PCs in your organisations at the time? 

Also I checked the current version of the Chrome Webroot filtering the extension and it seems better on the resources.

Also Chrome 80.xxx is coming soon. within a month I think.. Im so looking forward to it.

https://www.computerworld.com/article/3378017/fast-forward-whats-coming-in-future-versions-of-chrome.html

"Chrome 80: Freeze, tabs! And we mean it this time!

To reduce the browser's memory usage and its impact on notebook batteries, Chrome 80 will automatically "freeze" tabs that have been in the background for five or more minutes. "Frozen pages are not able to run any tasks," said Google."

Yahoo! I open 30 tabs sometimes and it halts my win system.. I was thinking of switching to Chromebook on i3.

Userlevel 7
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@meservo,

When we first started using the extension I think our PCs ranged from 5-10 years old. So, yes it’s not unexpected to see performance problems on older PCs. However, I shouldn’t see an extension drain the PC dry. Also, we use Firefox as our main browser.

 

If you’re running a newer system I would suggest Firefox over Chrome. Chrome has to much of a foothold in the web industry and it’s killing competition. As @TripleHelix pointed out, even the new version Microsoft Edge, or as some refer to it as Credge because it uses the Chromium engine. Firefox’s latest builds have some really nice features for blocking trackers and ads to help protect your data privacy. I’ve been a longtime Firefox user and before these new features my Windows 10 PC would use 5+ GB of RAM for Firefox or Chrome alone. Now, Firefox uses around 1 GB because it’s keeping all that crap from loading and tracking when you visit a webpage, plus pages load faster. I’ll admit, Chrome is also using less memory too. However, Google through Chrome puts on the face of pushing for better security and standards while at the same time creating a vehicle to massively track users because of the lack of browser engine competition. Just my thoughts on browsers.

 

Edit:

Almost forgot, I think Firefox already freezes tabs. I’d have to double check that, but I’ve noticed tabs reload if I haven’t been to them and they’ve been open for awhile. Plus @meservo, close some of those tabs and save even more memory or use something like Pocket (built into Firefox). :grin:

 

Sincerely,

NicCrockett

Userlevel 3
Badge +7

@NicCrockett 

The problem is Windows itself. How it runs. Its a cobweb of patches upon patches hodge-podge.

Ultimately is maintaining an optimum web experience with security and simplicity. Chrome uses resources to maintain that. My laptop is 4 years old and it had critical power issues. I got a warranty replacement last week and now the replacement is a lot better in handling the load.

 

An i3 intel based Chromebook is way better and doesn't even need an i5 according to my research. Perfect companion for a browser based workspace. With Chrome and hopefully within next few years: Fuchsia hopefully Win will get a run for its money.

Other benefits are excellent security on Chromebooks. They have come a long way.

 

I honestly don't use much besides browser windows. Windows environment will most likely be a secondary environment for Microsoft related activities but primary environment should be for browser focus business Chromebooks, Chromeboxes. I was looking at Acer Spin 13

 

 

Userlevel 7
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@meservo,

Now you’re getting into a use case scenario. I know people can use a Chromebook with great success and generally the price is lower, allowing for a faster refresh cycle. If you and/or your users can make that work in your favor, more power to you.

 

However, I’m all over the map with what I’m using and an i3 Chromebook with a few GBs of RAM would be a joke. That’s not to say the device you’re buying is bad. Again, if it fits your needs, go with it. However, I’m running Microsoft Office, including Access, and SQL for testing and data mining. I don’t believe a Chromebook can handle these. If it can’t handle these, I promise you it can’t handle my Adobe CC apps that recommend an i7 processor and 8 or 16 GB of RAM depending on the app.

 

I just personally bought a new laptop for the first time in 7+ years. Because I’m such a power user and manage our network from anywhere, I got an i7 with 16 GB RAM and upgraded Windows to Pro instead of Home. Like I said, it’s all about usage. If a Chromebook works, great! However, power users like myself need a stronger OS environment that allows me to control it. That may be the downside to the Chromebook environment. It doesn’t have the management systems in place like Windows does. I’m not defending Windows, but they have been doing this longer. Management systems like Active Directory and Group Policy have been in place for over two decades. This could also be Webroot’s issue. I tried using the Mac version of Webroot when we started using it and the GSM policies didn’t work with Macs. It also played havoc with settings that my Mac users had to use and it couldn’t keep track of the keycode. I haven’t tested this in awhile, so I don’t know how the Mac version has changed. I can see in the GSM Console that more settings in the policies are applied to Macs, but still not nearly everything. It’s possible that this same management approach has been taken with Chromebooks, which could be blocking the extension.

 

You are so right about the patches upon patches. It’s ridiculous, but Microsoft supports a product longer than anyone I know. Their standard lifecycle is 10 years. Apple is the last 3 versions, which translates into roughly 3 years for 5 times the price. I don’t know Chromebook’s lifecycle, but my Google Pixel XL stopped receiving security updates in December 2019, 3 years after it came out. I realize Android and Chromebooks aren’t the same, but I’m guessing the lifecycle is the same since they are owned by the same company.

 

Again, if you have a solution that works for you, great! This is just the ramblings of a crazy user.  :laughing:

 

Sincerely,

NicCrockett

Userlevel 3
Badge +7

@NicCrockett

Actually the lifecycle for Windows 10 versions is about 6months. Each iteration lasts about 6 months  eg: current one is 1909. Previous version will expire soon. 

Do your research on Chromebooks, I did. Apps run virtually on Google servers I believe. Ive read up that i5 is an overkill for Chromebooks. I will test that when I buy one. You're thinking like a Windows user..And yes Microsoft apps are available on Chromebooks. G Suite management policies are excellent, the ones on G Suite Admin Console. Webroot is unnecessary in Chrome OS by the way. Chromebooks are not the same as Pixel - Pixel is Android OS and Chromebooks are Chrome OS. Pixel XL is about 5 years old. Most smartphones stop updates at some point.

Yoyre running Ancient legacy systems and then have complaints to Webroot. Its great you upgraded. Simple fact is tech companies need to make money and have end of life for everything. Don't expect what used to be the case where systems lasted 10 years. Thats star trek quality.

Regards, meservo

 

Userlevel 7
Badge +28

@meservo,

 

I’ll admit the Windows 10 lifecycle has become more complicated. I’ve heard reports that they are considering a single major upgrade per year instead of two. I don’t know this for fact, just news I’ve heard on podcasts. However, let’s demystify the Windows 10 lifecycle because it still lasts longer than you say. I’ll use the Desktop PC I’m using right now as an example. It’s my work desktop that was purchased in January 2017, so exactly 3 years ago. It came with Windows 10 Pro version 1607, which I highlighted in yellow below. As you can see the lifecycle for version 1607 is longer than 6 months, it was about a year and 8 months. This PC can support newer versions of Windows 10 and I now have it up to version 1909, which I highlighted in blue. Because it can support version 1909 it’s Windows 10 lifecycle is now 5 years and 9 months, going all the way to May 2022. I expect to be able to continue installing the Windows 10 Feature Updates, whether they are twice or once a year, for at least 2 or 3 more years. By that point this PCs Windows 10 lifecycle will have reached around 10 years, and maybe longer if it continues supporting the Windows 10 Feature Updates.

Windows 10 Lifecycle from Versions 1507 to 1909

 

You are absolutely correct that I should do more research on Chromebooks. If I had the chance to get one, I would, but I’m not made of money and the company isn’t going to pay for me to experiment. We also don’t host much of our business in the cloud because it’s impractical. Impractical for us, not everyone. Can you imagine trying to constantly push 9 GB print files across an internet connection. We don’t have GB connections in our area and if we did, why pay for something we can host in-house.

Just a matter of correction on the Pixel XL. They are only just over 3 years old, not 5 years old. You might consider them old tech, but why waste money when something is perfect. I’m on the latest version of Android, still have great battery life, Apps work fine, and the camera is amazing. As of December they stopped releasing security updates to it. So, now I have a reason to replace it, but until then it was a perfectly good phone. Why create more e-waste, just to line corporations pockets. Also, I do know there is a difference between Android and Chromebook, as I stated in my last post.

 

As for running ancient legacy systems I’m guessing you’re referring to some of my other posts in the community. All I can say is welcome to the world of manufacturing. A world where you can’t control everything you have to support. Your equipment provider writes software for an older OS that runs your press. You don’t replace a 1.5 million dollar press after a few years because the front end is running Windows XP. We’ve been in business for 76 years and have a functioning press that is more than 50 years old. Granted that one doesn’t have a PC running it, but you see how long presses can last if taken care of. The equipment manufacturers that I’m talking about aren’t small either, they are big international companies like Heidelberg, FujiFilm, and Xerox.

As for the system I personally upgraded, it was running Windows 8.1 which is still supported. I only replaced the laptop because the screen started flickering. I understand that tech companies need to make money. However, maybe if they weren’t spending billions on court cases and constantly trying to force users to upgrade to a new version that users don’t understand, they may find that users are receptive to buying their products. If the companies concentrated on issues that plague users, like cybersecurity, they may win back customers and their loyalty.

 

Sincerely,

NicCrockett

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