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If you are using social connect and originally registered for the Community using Facebook, your community password will be the same as for your Facebook account. If you need to reset your password, you will need to do it via Facebook. Click here to do that now. You can also disconnect your profile from Facebook if you prefer – just send me a PM and I'll be glad to help!   Best, Webroot Community Team
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Webroot SecureAnywhere does not remove legitimate programs, more commonly known as PUAs. A PUA (Potentially Unwanted Application) is a program that may be unwanted, but was installed with user consent. PUAs commonly include toolbars, cleaners, and search plugins. They are often bundled together with other software a user intended to install. They are not harmful in the same way as malware, but can be a hindrance. It is important to remember to download all software only from the official or original source for that software. We do not recommend downloading any software from large/generic download sites if there is a direct source available, as this is how programs are most commonly bundled with PUAs. Please follow the steps below to clean out any unwanted software from your system and internet browsers. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Part 1: Remove the software via the Windows Control Panel Note: this option is only available for some toolbars, if the PUA is a toolbar. Follow the correct steps for your Operating System. Windows XP: Click Start, then click Run. In the Run window, type "appwiz.cpl" (without quotes), then press Enter on your keyboard. Windows Vista/Windows 7: Click Start, or the Windows icon. In the Search field, type "appwiz.cpl" (without quotes), then press Enter on your keyboard. Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 Move your cursor to the bottom right of the screen to open the Charm Bar menu. Click Search, type "appwiz.cpl" (without quotes), and then press Enter on your keyboard.   This will open your Control Panel to the list of all programs currently installed on your computer.   Scroll down the programs list until you see the software you want to remove. Note: You want to uninstall any programs that have been installed recently (you can check this with the Install Date column) that you do not recall installing or that you do not need.   Click the software entry once to select it, then click Uninstall/Remove.   Confirm any messages to uninstall the program.   After removing any programs, there may be additional steps to take to remove any changes made by a PUA. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Part 2: Remove the software from your browser These steps should be used for certain PUAs that affect the browsing experience. We recommend removing any add-ons or toolbars you don't currently use. Choose the correct steps for your Internet browser. For Internet Explorer: Open Internet Explorer. Navigate to Tools > Manage Add-ons. Select “Toolbars and Extensions” from the left column. Uninstall everything related to the unwanted software from the list on the right. Click “Search Providers” from the left column. Right-click the search engine you want and click Set as Default. Now select the unwanted software and click the Remove button to uninstall it (lower right corner of the window). Once you have gone through this list, you can close the Manage Add-ons window. In Internet Explorer, navigate to Tools > Internet Options > General. Under Home page, click "Use Default" or enter your desired homepage, e.g. www.google.com Click OK to save the changes. For Mozilla Firefox: Open Mozilla Firefox. Navigate to Tools > Add-ons. Click Extensions. Uninstall/remove the extension(s) relating to the software. Navigate to Tools > Options > General. Under Home page, click "Restore to Default" or enter your desired homepage, e.g. www.google.com Click OK to save the changes. Note: If the software's search engine persists in Firefox, locate the Search Bar in the top right corner of the browser window. In the Search Bar, the icon for the active search engine appears. Click the icon to open a drop-down menu of the available search engines. Click "Manage Search Engines". Remove any entries related to the unwanted software from this list, then click OK. For Google Chrome: 1. Click the Menu button (the three lines in the upper right), then click Settings. 2. Under Search, click "Manage search engines…" 3. Remove any listings for the unwanted software, then click OK to save the changes. 4. Under “On Startup,” click "Set pages". 5. Remove any listings for the software, then click OK to save the changes. Next, there are steps to reset Internet Explorer. You only need to follow these steps if you use Internet Explorer to browse the web. If you use Firefox and would like to reset that browser, there are steps available on their support pages to do this as well. Please see the link below for that page: http://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/reset-firefox-easily-fix-most-problems Again, if you use Internet Explorer, it is highly recommended you also follow the steps below to reset your web browser. This helps correct many, many issues with Internet Explorer, even slowness. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Part 3: Reset Internet Explorer In some cases, add-ons in Internet Explorer can cause issues with the way pages are shown. Resetting Internet Explorer to the default settings may resolve such problems. It can also speed up your Internet browsing. Keep in mind that resetting Internet Explorer can reset your home pages, browsing history, form data, passwords, toolbars, etc. We will explain below how to prevent this. To use the Reset Internet Explorer Settings feature from Control Panel, follow these steps: Exit all programs, including Internet Explorer (if it is running).   Follow the correct instructions for your operating system: For Windows XP: Click Start, then click Run. In the Open box, type: inetcpl.cpl Now press the ENTER key. For Windows Vista or 7: Click Start, or the Windows start icon. In the Start Search box, type: inetcpl.cpl Now press the ENTER key. For Windows 8 and 8.1: Move your cursor to the bottom right of the screen to open the Charm Bar menu. Click Search and type: inetcpl.cpl Now press the ENTER key. For Windows 10: Move your cursor to the bottom left of the screen and Right Click to open the Start menu and click on Run. And type: inetcpl.cpl Now press the ENTER key. The Internet Options dialog box appears.   Click the Advanced tab.   Under Reset Internet Explorer settings, click Reset.   In the window that appears, ensure that the "Delete personal settings" box is NOT checked. This will prevent your home pages, etc. from being removed. Now click Reset again.   When Internet Explorer finishes resetting the settings, click “Close” in the Reset Internet Explorer Settings dialog.   Start Internet Explorer again. You may receive a "Welcome to Internet Explorer" message. You may choose to follow the prompts, or you may click Cancel. The message will not appear again in either case.   Once you have completed these steps, you should no longer have any PUAs on your system and any unwanted effects should be reversed. If you still experience any unwanted or suspicious behavior, please send us a message with detailed descriptions of the behavior(s).   Also add a good free Ad Blocker like the ones suggested below:   For Internet Explorer Ad Block Plus: https://adblockplus.org/   For Firefox uBlock Origin: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/ublock-origin/?src=ss or Privacy Badger: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-us/firefox/addon/privacy-badger-firefox/   Google Chrome uBlock Origin: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/ublock-o rigin/cjpalhdlnbpafiamejdnhcphjbkeiagm?hl=en or Privacy Badger: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/privacy-badger/pkehgijcmpdhfbdbbnkijodmdjhbjlgp   uBlock Origin For Microsoft Edge Browser on Windows 10: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/p/app/9nblggh444l4
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While WSA should be fully compatible with 3rd Party security software, you may encounter a time that you need to remove one of these programs with an uninstaller or manually. I have compiled this list so we have it all in one place and will try to update regularly to make sure the links all work properly. Also here is another list in this Community Thread: https://community.webroot.com/t5/Techie/Software-Removal-Tools/m-p/27608#M455 I have also added a part about creating a system restore point prior to running these, as that is always advisable. For Windows XP: Click Start> All Programs> Accessories > System Tools > System Restore Select Create a restore point, and choose Next. Enter a Restore point description; can be called “Prior to Remote Service.” Click Create, the creation process should take less than 30 seconds to complete. Click Close.  For Windows Vista/7: Click Start > All Programs> Accessories > System Tools > System Restore Choose Continue for the User Access Control warning Click link To create a restore point, open System Protection. Click the Create Enter a Restore point description; can be called “Prior to Remote Service.” Click Create, the creation process should take less than 30 seconds to complete Click OK on the successful creation point screen Click OK on the System Properties Click Cancel on the System Restore For Windows 8, 8.1 and Windows 10: Right-click the Start  button, then select Control Panel > System. In the left pane, select System protection. Select the System Protection tab, and then select Create. In the System Protection dialog box, type a description, and then select Create.   Avast!:  http://www.avast.com/eng/avast-uninstall-utility.html Avira/Antivir: http://www.avira.com/en/support-for-home-knowledgebase-detail/kbid/902(manual uninstallation) AVG (aka Ewido, Grisoft, RogueRemover): http://www.avg.com/us-en/utilities BitDefender:  http://kb.bitdefender.com/site/article/333/ BullGuard http://www.bullguard.com/support/product-guides/bullguard-internet-security-guides-12/getting-started/uninstalling-bullguard.aspx Comodo Firewall Pro 3:    http://forums.comodo.com/help_for_v3/comprehensive_instructions_for_completely_removing_comodo_firewall_pro_3_info-t17220.0.html Comodo Internet Security: https://support.comodo.com/index.php?_m=knowledgebase&_a=viewarticle&kbarticleid=298 ESET NOD32: http://support.eset.com/kb2788/ FRISK F-PROT Antivirus for Windows http://www.f-prot.com/support/windows/fpwin_faq/25.html F-Secure https://community.f-secure.com/t5/Security-for-PC/How-do-I-uninstall-the-product/ta-p/15384 K7 Total Security https://www.k7computing.com/eng/free-tools Kaspersky Lab's: http://support.kaspersky.com/#s_tab4 MalwareBytes http://www.malwarebytes.org/mbam-clean.exe McAfee: https://service.mcafee.com/FAQDocument.aspx?id=TS101331 Microsoft Security Essentials https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2435760 Norton/Symantec:  https://www-secure.symantec.com/norton-support/jsp/help-solutions.jsp?docid=kb20080828154508EN_EndUserProfile_en_us Panda http://www.pandasecurity.com/resources/sop/UNINSTALLER_08.exe Panda Cloud Internet Protection http://www.pandasecurity.com/resources/sop/Cloud_AV_Uninstaller.exe Pareto Logic http://www.paretologic.com/resources/help/xoftspyse/195.htm Sophos http://www.sophos.com/support/knowledgebase/article/11019.html Super Anti Spyware http://www.superantispyware.com/supportfaqdisplay.html?faq=47 Sunbelt VIPRE:   http://support.vipreantivirus.com/support/solutions/articles/1000070702-how-to-manually-remove-vipre-antivirus-or-vipre-internet-security Trend Micro http://esupport.trendmicro.com/en-us/home/pages/technical-support/1105809.aspx Trend Micro Worry-Free Business Security Agent http://esupport.trendmicro.com/solution/en-us/1057237.aspx Windows Live OneCare (direct link to removal tool): http://download.microsoft.com/download/4/c/b/4cb845e7-1076-437b-852a-7842a8ab13c8/OneCareCleanUp.exe Zone Alarm: http://server.iad.liveperson.net/hc/s-28464961/cmd/kbresource/kb-7009759154545969596/view_question!PAGETYPE?sq=uninstall%2btool&sf=101113&st=157680&documentid=392324&action=view  
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Note:  This is not an officially supported configuration for Webroot so use this at your own risk.   How to install the Web Filter Extension if it's missing in Firefox or to add to other Firefox Based Browsers which are not supported by Webroot. From the Hidden WRData Folder you will need the files below.   This will work for all Firefox based Browsers such as Firefox, Palemoon, Cyberfox and Waterfox and other Firefox based browsers I suppose.....? And I forget the Location for the Hidden WRData Folder on XP?   Has to be a Zip file as other extensions will not work like .RAR   1. Go the the Hidden WRData Folder and look for the files below and Copy and Paste to your Desktop       2. Add all files to a Zip file like below and it must have the ZIP Extension with whatever zipping tool you use     3. Zip all the files together     4. Drag the Desktop.zip File into the open Firefox Browser with the Add-on page open.     5. When you Drag and Release the file it will ask you to Install so click the Install button then a restart of the browser will be needed and the Web Filter Extension will be installed.    
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I compiled this list to provide the answers to common questions we see, as well as a few tips for better password policy.   What are some of the things that makes a password not secure? Insecure passwords are short and use common words. Any password that is 6 characters or shorter is easy to brute force, that is easy to create all possibilities. Using a password that contains personal information is also not secure as hackers know this is a common technique people use to make a password they won’t forget.     What are the real dangers? There are many dangers to a weak password which boil down to which account it is protecting. From access to bank accounts to social media, passwords are used to protect access and if compromised, the consequences can be financial loss or someone having access to your email.     I think most people think, "If I am not going to give my password out to anyone, then it can be as easy as possible so it's easy for me to remember. Besides, who would bother taking the time to try and guess my password?" How is this kind of thinking inaccurate? The, “it won’t happen to me” logic is wrong. The reality is that hackers today can perform large scale attacks that look at millions of accounts. They might not be targeting you specifically, that is until they break into your account. It is more a crime of opportunity.     What if someone has a favorite password that they don't want to get rid of? I would recommend making modifications of the password. For example, change some of the letters to be numbers or consider adding an extra work before or after your chosen password. I don’t recommend keeping a favorite password. Passwords are meant to be changed occasionally so don’t get too attached     What would you say to someone who says they only have ONE password for everything because they just can't bother remembering like 20 different ones for everything? I would encourage them to then remember two passwords. One for their main email account and one for everything else. Another option would be to use a password manager that makes it very easy to have different passwords for all accounts which is the most secure.     Would love to hear any additional thoughts you have on password security or common misconceptions. The email password is the big one as if you break into someone’s email, you can then gain access to all other accounts as the ‘I forgot my password’ option sends an email to reset the password.     *Other tips for a secure password*   My other advice is to make your passwords very long.   I often pick a phrase I like and convert it into a password. For example, lets use a simple password like "Iliketurtles." This password is not very secure and can be guessed or cracked fairly quickly. Changing "Iliketurtles" to "x1L1k3Turtl35!x" has increased the work required to crack it exponentially.   Lastly, a compromised password is only useful while the password remains the same.   If you suspect your password has been compromised, then change it right away.   I also recommend changing your password every 6 months as part of a strong personal password security policy. I hope this helps and feel free to comment any personal ideas, tips, etc you may have.   More info here: http://www.webroot.com/En_US/SecureAnywhere/PC/WSA_PC_Help.htm#C7_PasswordManagement/CH7_PasswordManagement.htm    
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Get the lowdown on the newest version of Windows
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Ranks reward you for your presence in community and the contributions that you make. They let other community members know more about you, how active you are, and where your expertise lies.    The idea is, the more you contribute ideas, help others, and share your voice, the higher rank you’ll get. Makes sense, right?   Here are the Webroot Community Ranks (in order):   New Member Member New Voice Frequent Voice Community Guide Sr. Community Guide Community Leader Sr. Community Leader Community Expert Advisor Sr. Community Expert Advisor Bronze VIP Silver VIP Gold VIP   Your rank is indicated by the icon next to your name. For example, the rank of New Voice is signified by a microphone icon. Each time your rank changes, we’ll send you a message so you’ll know right away. For more info see here: https://community.webroot.com/t5/custom/page/page-id/VIP_Program#.UvvzJPldVoM   Have questions? Shoot me (Nic) a private message so I can help. 
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Thanks to tearinghairout101 for this writeup:   I am done and done with the credit freezes.  If anyone decides to do this, be prepared to have to "thaw" several days before you want to apply for a loan or credit card or other.  There is plenty of information on each site about how it works and whether it's a good "fit" for someone.  We did ask if we could still use our current credit cards without waiting, for instance in the grocery line for three days while our ice cream melted, and were told our current credit cards can be used as usual and are not affected.  They'd better be right.    If anyone wants the info:   Equifax....1-800-685-1111.  Be prepared to answer questions...SS#, address, birthdate, etc. to verify.  We got our Pin and Confirmation #'s on the phone after paying $5 (it differs from state to state, but there is a list of how much is charged in each state).  If you are married, you both have to freeze your credit separately.  Our phone disconnected before my husband got his Pin, so had to call Customer Care and wait a long time to talk to someone, but she did give us his Confirmation#.  That phone contact is 1-800-829-4577.  Will receive all the info in the mail.   Experian....Done online.  Look for "freeze account" or however it's worded.  Fill in information.  After they confirm and you pay, a page should come up with an ID#.  Didn't notice that when my husband did his, but I caught mine and printed it out.  Pin and Confirmation numbers will come in the mail.   TransUnion....1-888-909-8872.  Do NOT go to the website and set up an account.  Big mistake.  Couldn't get into the account and wasted a lot of time trying, so finally found phone number and called.  Come up with a 6-digit personal pin....they will ask you for one.  I had to scramble to write down the first one so I wouldn't forget it, so have one ready.  Otherwise, questions, pay, and packet will be mailed in 5-7 days.  Actually maybe the easiest one once I used the phone number.   Some of the multiple choice questions at one site (I think it was TransUnion) were a bit weird, like "on your driver's license, what color are your eyes";  "did you live with any of these people in the last 5 years", "what is the term on our car loan".  On the Customer Service call to Equifax, we had to tell them how much our car loan was/month.  A lot of scrambling around to find answers on a few things, but nothing totally ridiculous.  I'm glad they were checking some offbeat things to verify it was us.  
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What is POODLE?   POODLE stands for Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption.  What that means in practical terms is that there is a vulnerability in the SSLv3 communication protocol that allows for man-in-the-middle attack on secure HTTP connections   Can you repeat that in English?   This vulnerability can allow a compromised WIFI hotspot or ISP to snoop on your secure connections.  A man in the middle attack is like the game of telephone with three people, and the person in the middle is the bad guy.  He or she intercepts encrypted communications and can decrypt them to snoop passwords or other confidential data.  For instance if you are doing online banking then a malicious man-in-the-middle could get your password and other confidential data transmitted.   When will this be fixed?   There is currently no fix or patch for this vulnerability.  SSLv3 is an older version of the HTTPS protocol, and is only used for compatibility for older browsers and has been replaced by the newer TLS 1.0 protocol.   How can I protect myself?   Make sure you use an up to date browser, and turn off SSLv3 for your browser.  Here are instructions for Internet Explorer and Chrome, and here are instructions for Firefox.   This page will also tell you if SSLv3 is on or off in your browser to confirm that you've disabled it.      
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Apart from grounding your kids  or having the awkward “we need to talk” talk, there are some serious risks for kids who are connected all the time. The truth is, even if parents trust that their kids are making the right decisions online, threats such as online predators, inappropriate content, and cyberbullies are real.   The Internet safety for children advocacy group, ikeepsafe.org, brings to light three main risks associated with all connected technology: Inappropriate Contact, Content, and Conduct (the 3 C’s).   Inappropriate contact occurs when strangers or predators online reach out to kids to establish new relationships or to engage in regular communication. “The Internet is a place to enhance existing relationships, not a place to meet new people,” warns the organization.   And it happens more than we would like to think. A recent study done by  GFI software  found that “nearly one third (29%) of teens have been contacted online by a stranger, and 23% of those say have responded in some way.” With these numbers in mind, it’s important that kids understand the risks associated with giving out personal information to people they don’t know.   ikeepsafe.org also recognizes that inappropriate content—or “content that is viewed and content that is uploaded by kids”—is another legitimate concern for parents.     A report by Common Sense Media found that “79% of teens think their friends share too much personal information online,” and that’s exactly the type of information that can make an impact down the road. The takeaway here is this: if kids are cognizant of the threat, it’s probably worth addressing as a parent.   And how about the way kids are treated online by peers—do parents really know? It’s been pointed out that kids can encounter inappropriate contact and inappropriate content online, but the child advocacy group also uproots the notion of inappropriate conduct.   Parents may never know if, for example, their kids are victims of cyberbullies, predators online, or even bullies themselves. And the threats are very real:  cyberbullying has been linked to depression or anger ; conversations with predators have lead to actual encounters; a seemingly harmless social media rant about a teacher or a fellow student can have serious effects on a child’s future.   Here are some staggering statistics on  teen Internet use  (via redorbit.com):   15% of all teenage girls surveyed have been bullied online or via text message 31% of teens admit to saying something to someone online that they would not have said face-to-face 31% of teenage boys admit to visiting a website intended for adults 53% of all teenagers have lied about their age to gain access to adult sites 34% of teens say they have created online accounts that their parents do not know about   The Internet can give kids the sense of invincibility (or anxiety depending on how you look at it), and the numbers above support that idea. So the project for parents then becomes a) helping kids understand that their personal information and digital footprint are worth protecting, and b) making sure the virtualization of the Internet does not confuse the seriousness of real world consequences.   Cyber safety for kids doesn't have to be a difficult task. The tools above suggest that basic methods in monitoring and education (the 3 C’s) can make a world of difference. The “playing with apps at the dinner table instead of eating” situation, well, that one might take a little more work.   Please visit the following sites for more information:   ikeepsafe.org cyberbullying.us isafe.org internetsafetyforkids.org antiphishing.org pewinternet.org
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A QR Code (or Quick Response Code), is a barcode that looks like this:     When scanned with a QR Code reader, it will commonly take you to a website represented by the QR Code.   What else are QR Codes used for? There are other uses for QR Codes as well.  In fact, they were originally used for industrial labeling, but most of the time you see them these days it will be for marketing purposes.  It’s not uncommon to see QR Codes on advertisements or even telephone poles these days.  A lot of guerilla marketing campaigns will leave QR Codes lying around cities in places people might be tempted to scan them just to see what they are.  For instance, Facebook recently painted a giant QR Code on their roof.   Readers for QR Codes are very common as well.  There are a lot of free apps available for Android and iOS devices which can be downloaded to your device and be used to scan QR Codes, which will then send you off to the sites those codes represent.   The important thing to remember about these kinds of apps is that they are not all created equally.  Some such apps will show you the link the code sends you to before you go there and allow you to choose whether or not you want to go there.  Other ones will just drop you at the link without checking with you about it first.  It’s important that when you choose your QR Code Reader app that you pick one that lets you see the site first.  Why is this important? Well, like any other links, links from QR Codes can also host malware.   What kind of malware could they contain? The first malware discovered in a QR Code was housed in an Android app called JIMM (my username frowns at this!  ).  Ever since then, malware has become more and more prevalent on Android devices.  In 2011, malware attacks on Android grew over 3,000%. That’s not an extra zero in there.  This malware is capable of all sorts of bad stuff.  It can obtain your calendar, contacts, and credit card info, along with any other data you store on your device.  It can take your password for Google or Facebook.  It could even track your location.  The example I cited above would send SMS messages to a premium number and charge your phone bill.   If you have a good mobile security product like Webroot, it will pick up on the malware when you attempt to access the link anyway, but a lot of times you don’t even need to get to that point.  If your QR Code Reader shows you the link and it looks like a bad link, you can just tell the app you don’t want to go there.  That’s why it’s so important to have an app that lets you see that info.   Are QR Codes ever shortened URLs? Yes, sometimes the QR Code is shortened.  I noticed recently that one of our own QR Codes uses such a shortening method because the URL it sends you to is very big otherwise.  The code provided is very vague, along the lines of a bit.ly or goo.gl link.    There are legitimate reasons for using the link shorteners, and it certainly doesn’t mean that every QR Code that uses one is bad.  However, the shortened link hides whatever the longer link was to begin with, making it more difficult to determine whether or not the link is good or bad.  When dealing with such a link, it becomes all the more important that your mobile security product is good enough to deal with taking the risk out of visiting such a site for you.  Links that redirect are a mixed bag.  Sometimes it’s an ok website.  Sometimes it’s just masking a malware site.  If you have Webroot SecureAnywhere installed, it will take care of this for you as long as the link opens up via Android’s default browser or Webroot’s own SecureWeb app which comes bundled in the Complete version of Webroot on Android and isavailable for free on iOS devices.   What else can you do to protect yourself from malicious QR Codes?   Back Up Your Information. One thing you should always do anyway is back up your information.  Generally speaking, your device is probably already set up to do this automatically when you plug it in to your computer.  In a worst case scenario, you could always revert to the backed up state.  You should check with your device manufacturer to ensure the automated backup is set up on your device if you are uncertain about this. Be Proactive. Another thing you can be proactive about is keeping your firmware up to date.  This is typically managed by your carrier, but you may receive prompts to install the update.  Don’t put it off.  Firmware updates are frequently used to patch exploits. Don’t Store Sensitive Data. Try not to store sensitive data on your phone.  If you can avoid it, why take the risk at all?  Don’t store your credit card number or anything else you’re afraid of a thief stealing on your mobile device. The most important part of protecting yourself is still a good security app, but hopefully some of this knowledge will be useful to you in keeping yourself safe as well.
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iOS   Enable data protection by creating a passcode for your iOS device:   Tap Settings > General > Passcode Follow the prompts to create your passcode Once your code is set, scroll to the bottom of the screen and verify that "Data protection is enabled" is visible Apple Support   Android   Android encryption can take hours to complete and will need to be done with a full battery. Keep in mind that you can only reverse encryption by performing a factory reset on your phone.   Enable your lock screen PIN or password: Open Settings > tap Security > tap Screen Lock > Tap PIN or Password Plug in your phone and do not unplug/interrupt the encryption process (you will lose data from your phone) Open Settings > tap Security > tap Encrypt phone/tablet under Encryption Android Support
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It's important that you safeguard your Personal Identification Number (PIN).   Don't use your birth date or year Don't use sequential numbers and do not repeat the same number (1234, 1111) Don't use the last four of your SSN Don't use your phone number or address (no relatives either!) DO use a random phrase using the letters associated with numbers   (Source: aarp.org, cba.ca)
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One sometimes-overlooked security measure, that everyone should be using (particularly if you're using services from the likes of Google and/or Microsoft) is two-factor authentication. Below is a quick overview of how to setup two factor authentication for your Google and Microsoft accounts:   1. Google  After signing into your Google account, click 'Account'. Click 'Security' on the left tan and then click 'Edit' under '2-Step Verification'. This will take you to the '2 Step Verification' settings page. Follow the step-by-step guide as you go through the setup process. For more details (including how to easily setup two-factor authentication on your Android device, check out this Google support page)    2. Microsoft You have a Microsoft account if you use services like Skydrive, Outlook.com, Xbox Live, etc...and two-factor authentication is a great aid in helping this account not get compromised. Here is how to set up two-factor authentication for your Microsoft account: Visit account.live.com and login.  After you're logged in, select 'Security Info' on the left hand side. Microsoft may ask you to verify your identity (they'll send you a security code via text or call or email depending on the info you provided when you first set up your account). Select the preferred option to get this security code and click 'Next'. Enter the code on the next screen and click 'Submit'. You can now access your security settings.  Find the 'Two Step Verification heading and click 'Set up two-step verification. Microsoft will take you through the process.  For the full detailed instructions, check out the original post, courtesy of PC World.      (Source: PCWorld) 
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I have seen a number of tickets in our support system of people being unable to download browsers. In fact its due to to Webroot blocking 3rd party toolbar bundled versions of the browsers.  Always make sure you are downloading directly from the Vendor and not a 3rd party . Be aware that the top results in a search page can be paid for advertisments and thus may not be the vendor.    In the image below I have done a search using well known search provider. Note that in this case the first result was directly from the vendor (Mozilla) but as you start to go down the search results its gets a bit unclear.   To the left of the screen shot I am showing the open file -security warning alert on two versions of Firefox that I have downloaded. Note the top left one has a Publisher: Mozilla Corportation, the bottom one 100Blogs SL is a toolbar wrapped version.The File with the Mozilla Corporation was downloaded from the vendors website (the 1st link in the screenshot), the second one was from a 3rd party that contained a number of toolbars.   Please note that Publisher isnt always 100% accurate (we do see lots of spoofed digitial vendors etc) its still a useful piece of information. I would advise when installing software to use the custom installation option so you can untick any "unwanted" extra`s that the program may want to try and install.   I would advise using a modern secure browser with our extension installed (Adblock is also useful to install) as you can see one of the sites has a red X beside it indicating it may not be safe to visit.     If you are ever unsure dont run the file and submit a support ticket or post on the community. We can verify a file very quickly and if possible we can point you in the right direction for the correct download.
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October is almost over and that means National Cyber Security Awareness month is almost at a close. Over the course of the last 30 days here at Webroot, we've been posting and socializing what we think were some useful security tips for every user to follow. Below is the recap of the ones that we've posted here on the Webroot Community.   1. Encrypting your mobile data: This post breaks down how to encrypt mobile data on both iOS and Android devices.   2. University Networks Are Malware Breeding Grounds: Not a direct tip, but rather a story that reminds students to keep their mobile device protected as University Networks are 300% more likely to contain malware.   3. Creating a Secure Passcode in iOS: This post will help you maximize security on your iOS devices.   4. How to stay safe at an ATM: We use ATM's on the daily, but it's surprising how many people neglect simple security steps to keep their accounts secure.    5. Two-factor authentication for Google and Microsoft Accounts: This post breaks down how to set up two-factor authentication for your Google and Microsoft accounts, which is another important, but overlooked security measure that is simple to set up.    6. 'Digital Natives' are more at risk of getting hacked: This post covers a recent Marble Security survey and explains why people from the younger, digital-savvy generation actually have a higher chance of getting breached.   7. 'CNET Installer' Adware on Mac apps: Today's tip. If you have a Mac and use download.com to download popular Mac apps, read this tip. It will help prevent you from potentially installing an unwanted toolbar containing malware and explain how to remove it in case you do.   These seven tips are just the ones we posted here on the Community. I hope you found them helpful. We also posted tips across ourTwitter and Facebook pages so if you find these useful, don't forget to 'follow' and 'like' us.   
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This subject was inspired by a recent conversation here on the community about fake DHL emails that lead to scams.   So, what exactly is phishing?   Phishing is a type of online scam where criminals send an email that appears to be from a legitimate company asking you to provide sensitive information. This is usually done by including a link that supposedly takes you to the company’s website where you are asked to fill in your information – but the website is a clever fake and the information you provide goes straight to the crooks behind the scam.   The term ‘phishing’ is a pun on the word fishing because criminals are dangling a fake ‘lure’ (the email that looks legitimate, as well as the website that looks legitimate) hoping users will ‘bite’ by providing the information the criminals have requested – such as credit card numbers, account numbers, passwords, user names, and more.   Here are some clues that usually indicate an email is a scam: The email is not addressed to you. “Dear Customer” isn’t an identifier You don’t have an account with the company, or haven’t used the company’s service Grammatical errors. Usually, you’ll notice weird capitalizations and terrible grammar. They push you with urgent messages to open attachments or click on links. If you hover over links with your mouse, you’ll see the URL destination on the bottom of your browser. You can clearly see that all links send you away from the company site—or they try to fool you by adding the company name somewhere in the URL. Seeing any one of these flaws is enough to tell you the email is a phishing attempt – but what if these errors aren’t present? A smarter scammer could have corrected all these mistakes, including knowing the recipient’s name and email address, and masking their URL in a much more convincing manner. If they had done a better job there would have been nothing in the message to trigger your alarm bells – even though the email would still be fake.   So how can you guarantee you don’t fall for a phishing scam? Apply these two actions consistently and you will be nearly 100% protected from online scams:   Drive, don’t be pulled. Stay in the driver’s seat by finding the website yourself. This is the ONLY way to guarantee you land on the legitimate site. If you use the link (or phone number) in an email, IM, ad on a website/blog site/forum/social network/text message, etc., where you land (or who you talk to) is their choice, not yours. The website they take you to (or the ‘bank manager’ on the phone) may be a very convincing copy, but if you enter your information it will be stolen and abused. Instead, use your own link. If you use the company, you may already have a bookmark for the website you can use, if not, use a search engine and type in the company’s name, then use the link from your search engine to go to the correct site. If the email is legitimate, you will see the same information when you log into your account on the legitimate site. Install or activate a web tool that identifies malicious sites for you so you know the website you find is legitimate. There are several tools that will do this for you. Every standard browser now has a tool you can turn on to alert you if a website you are about to click on, or just clicked on, is safe or malicious. // Alex // Webroot Community Enthusiast //
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To perform certain operations on your computer, you may need to view extensions for known file types. See the instructions below for Windows XP or Vista/Windows 7 and 8 operating systems. Windows XP: On your keyboard, press and hold the "Windows" key (usually located between CTRL and ALT) and tap the letter "E" one time. A Windows Explorer window opens. In the Explorer window, select the Tools menu and select Folder Options... The Folder Options box opens. On the Folder Options box, select the View tab. On the View tab, under Advanced Settings, uncheck the box next to Hide extensions for known file types. Then click OK on the Folder Options box. Extensions for known file types will now display. Windows Vista/Windows 7: On your keyboard, press and hold the "Windows" key (usually located between CTRL and ALT) and tap the letter "E" one time. A Windows Explorer window opens. In the Explorer window, select the Organize menu and select Folder and search options. The Folder Options box opens. On the Folder Options box, select the View tab. On the View tab, under Advanced Settings, uncheck the box next to Hide extensions for known file types. Then click OK on the Folder Options box. Extensions for known file types will now display. Windows 8: On your keyboard, press and hold the "Windows" key (usually located between CTRL and ALT) and tap the letter "E" one time. A Windows Explorer window opens. In the Explorer Window, click View to the left of File. There will be three check boxes to the left, check the box next to File name extensions. Extensions for known file types will now display.
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Question How do you fix a memory leak? Answer When you run System Analyzer, it may report a program has a memory leak. Common programs to report this are Microsoft Outlook (outlook.exe) and Internet Explorer (iexplore.exe). This is not an issue with an infection on your computer. Memory leaks are when programs on the computer incorrectly manage memory allocations. This is not uncommon on modern software and can cause performance drags on the system. The easiest way to fix this issue is to close and reopen the program with the leak, as it will reset the allocations. If this does not seem to help, restarting the computer should do resolve the leak. If you are still having issues with a memory leak within a program, contact the support for the software having the leak as they will be able to best assist you. For example, if System Analyzer reports outlook.exe has a memory leak, it would be best to contact Microsoft Support.
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These advanced tools are useful for pre-infected PC's that didn’t have Webroot installed and for fixing some pre-existing non-virus related issues.   These tools are very useful in fixing infections (or the damage they caused), and they are also useful if the PC was once used in a corporate environment (restricted policies etc.). The first screen shows where to find the options. If you click on the "Antimalware Tools" option in the PC Security Tab, you will get the options shown in the second screen.   These options are intended for advanced users and for use when directed by Webroot Support.         In this list (screen shot shown below) we have a number of useful features.   1) Reset Desktop Wallpaper   This does as it says it removes the current wallpaper and puts the default windows one back. This is useful if a policy has been set to restrict wall paper changes. It will replace the current background with a black screen. It requires a restart.   2) Reset Screensaver   It will reset your screensaver to the default screensaver.   3) Reset System Policies   This is a very useful option! This can be used not only on infected PC`s but also on PC`s that were once part of a work environment that had restricted polices (task manager, RegEdit disabled etc.). Certain infections will block RegEdit from being opened (to stop you from removing a run reg key). This feature requires a restart.   4) Reboot in Safe Mode   This feature reboots the PC in Safe Mode. It’s useful if you are having trouble getting into safe mode using F8. Also, some PC`s can be a little tricky getting into Safe Mode as the BIOS splash screen can go directly to the Windows boot screen very quickly. It also saves having to open MSConfig and select the safe boot switch.   5) Perform an immediate system reboot   Does exactly what it says. It comes with a warning (i.e save any open files), so make sure all pre-existing work is saved.   Manual Threat Removal:   This option is extremely useful as it uses the rollback feature of Secure anywhere. It’s not used very often, as SecureAnywhere, 99% of the time, will do all the work for you.  When you click on this option, a file browser will pop-up asking you to select a file. Once an executable is selected, Webroot will remove all of the associated registry links and files created by the infection.   Please note that a single infection may have a large amount of monitored behaviours so Secure Anywhere will fix/remove all associated behaviours but it may take a little longer than expected. Depending on the level of infection (if it’s running in active memory for instance) the PC may have to be restarted. Note: be careful when using this function! Only use it if you are 100% certain the process in an infection or if you have been given instructions to use this by Webroot support.   Removal Script:   Webroot Support can send manual removal scripts to a customer, which instructs SecureAnywhere to run a set number of instructions. The scripting function is very powerful, as you can use to delete or move files, registry entries, folders etc.     Overall, these features are very powerful for advanced users and for Webroot Support.
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