cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Webroot® SecureAnywhere™ - Internet Security Plus KB

Top Contributors
Sort by:
Users of WSA Home versions that include Webroot Filtering Extensions in their browser can disable the extensions by the following directions. 
View full article
If you have the Complete or Internet Security Plus edition of Webroot SecureAnywhere, you can use the Password Manager with Safari, Chrome, and Firefox.   The Password Manager allows you to: Automatically fill in login credentials to access your favorite websites quickly and easily.   Automatically fill in web forms with a personal profile, such as an address, phone numbers, and credit card numbers.   Generate secure passwords for all your commonly used websites. With the Password Manager, you will never need to remember multiple login names and passwords, write them down on paper, or store them in an unencrypted file on your device. Plus, the Password Manager works across all your devices, including laptops, mobile phones, and tablets. Important note about the security of your Password Manager data: To keep your data safe from hackers, the Password Manager encrypts all your personal data on your local computer. SecureAnywhere uses the same encryption method employed by the US Government for Top Secret data. The encrypted data is meaningless to Webroot and to anyone else without the decryption key. This key is stored on your own computer and is created using your email address and master password. This personal data is never sent over the Internet. To get started with Password Management: Open SecureAnywhere on your Mac and make sure the Password Management component is configured. To check configuration: Open the SecureAnywhere interface (click the Webroot icon in the menu bar, then select Open Webroot SecureAnywhere from the drop-down menu).   From the main window, click Password Manager If the component installed successfully, the panel displays "Password Manager is Active"   Open your browser and make sure you see the Webroot icon in the toolbar. The icon is grayed out until you click it and log in with your Webroot account credentials. The examples below show how the icons appear for Safari or Chrome, and Firefox. (You can also hover your mouse over the icons for pop-up descriptions.)   Safari and Chrome:   Firefox:   If you have not yet created an account in the SecureAnywhere website, follow the instructions in Creating a Webroot account.   Access your Webroot account at my.webrootanywhere.com. Log in with your credentials. If the Passwords panel displays a Set Up Account Now button, click that button to enable Passwords. When the Passwords component is configured, the Set Up Account Now button changes to Go to Passwords. (This may take about 15 minutes.)   Click Go to Passwords to access the Password Manager. The Passwords panel opens, similar to the example below.
View full article
Question My Mac already has WSA installed, but I am not seeing the Password Management plugin. How do I install the toolbar manually? Answer While the Password Management toolbar usually installs automatically, ocassionally you may have to install it manually. To do so, follow the instructions below:   1. Download the plugin (.dmg): http://anywhere.webrootcloudav.com/zerol/pkgosxlp.dmg 2. After completing the download, open the file. 3. Double-click "lpmacosx.pkg". 4. Follow the prompts to continue, agree and install the toolbar. 5. If prompted, enter your Apple system password. 6. Click Install Software. 7. Safari launches automatically.  Click Install. 8. After completing the installation, you may close the Mac OS X installer window. Note: You may need to close and re-open your browsers for the changes to apply.
View full article
Question Can LastPass password data be transferred to the Webroot password manager? Answer It sure can.  In fact, there are 25 different predefined importation formats that are supported, including Generic CSV files, which most solutions offer as an export format.   Here's a screenshot of the area you can use for importing passwords data in the Webroot toolbar:
View full article
If you are currently using another password-management application, you can import data from that application into SecureAnywhere’s Password Manager. To import data using the browser toolbar: Make sure you are logged in to your Webroot account.   Open the Password functions by clicking the Webroot icon in the toolbar.   For Safari/Chrome (see the example below), click the Advanced icon (located at the bottom right), then click Import. For Firefox, click Tools, then Import From.   From the dialog, click the arrow next to the Source field and select a password-management application. Click Continue.   Follow the on-screen instructions for importing passwords from that application. (Since every password application is unique, the instructions for importing data from each one is also unique.) To import data using the SecureAnywhere website: Log in to my.webrootanywhere.com and click Go to Passwords.   Under MyIdentity actions, click Import data.   From the dialog, click the arrow next to the Import data from field and select a password-management application. Click Continue.   Follow the on-screen instructions for importing passwords from that application. (Since every password application is unique, the instructions for importing data from each one is also unique.)
View full article
To use the password generator: Make sure you are logged in to your Webroot account.   After logging in, click the Webroot icon again. For Safari/Chrome, click the Generate icon at the bottom: For Firefox, select Generate Secure Password from the drop-down menu.   In the Generate Password dialog, you have several options for selecting a password: Look at the password currently displayed in the top field (see the following example). If you are satisfied with that password, click Save.   Select from the options in the middle of the dialog and click Generate to display a new password in the top field (see the table at the end of this section for more information about the options). You can keep clicking Generate until you are satisfied, and then click Save. You can also look back at the previously generated passwords by clicking the drop-down arrow.   Once you click Save, the new password is filled into the web page's Password and Confirm Password fields.   Password Generation options Password Length Determines the number of characters for your password. Pronounceable Creates a password with consonants and vowels that do not generate an actual word, but can be pronounced and remembered. A-Z ... a-z.... 0-9 ... Special Includes capitals, lower case, numbers and special characters, depending on the checkboxes you select. Minimum Digit Count Specifies the amount of numbers, at minimum, you want to include in the password. ("Pronounceable" will override this setting.) Avoid Ambiguous Characters Does not include characters that might be confused with each other, such as a zero (0) and the letter "O." Require Every Character Type Includes at least one of the following character types: upper case, lower case, special character, and a number. ("Pronounceable" will override this setting.)
View full article
When you are logged in to your Webroot account from the browser toolbar, the Password Manager automatically detects any information you enter into login fields and prompts you to capture the credentials. Later, when you open that website again, the Password Manager can populate the login fields or log you in automatically. Two methods are available for capturing login credentials: Open a website and allow the Password Manager to capture the information as you type it. This is the quickest method. Manually define login credentials while your are logged into the SecureAnywhere website, in the Passwords page. Capturing login credentials while in a website: Make sure you are logged in to your Webroot account.   Open a website that requires login credentials, such as a banking site or social media site.   Log in to the website with your user name and password. The Password Manager detects the user name, password, and URL.   Look for the Password Manager prompt at the top of the browser (see the following example). Click Save Site. The Add Webroot Site dialog opens with the URL, user name, and password already saved.   If desired, you can change the name (appears on your Sites list), add notes, select a group, and select other options. See the following table for more information.   When you're done, click Save at the bottom of the panel.   Add Site dialog URL This is the web address. Do not change the URL. Name SecureAnywhere automatically fills in a site profile name, which appears on your list of profiles. If desired, you can change it to something simple, such as "My Credit Union." Group You can define a name for a group or select one from the list (if you already defined groups). By defining a group, you can organize sites by categories, such as Banking and Shopping. If you do not enter a group, the site is categorized in a default group. Username This is the user name that you entered in the site. You can change it, if you want. Password This is the password you entered in the site. You can change it, if you want. Notes Optionally, you can enter any notes that apply to this website, such as a PIN number for a credit card. Favorite If you access this site frequently, you can select this checkbox to save this site to your Favorites list. You can quickly access your Favorites from the Groups icon. Require Password Reprompt If you want to protect a particular site, secure note, or Form Fill profile so that any access using the information stored in the Password Manager requires your Webroot master password, click this checkbox. This setting provides additional control of individual sites, such as a bank login, where you want additional security. Never AutoFill Select this checkbox if you do not want your user name and password displayed in the login fields when you access the site. This is an extra security step, which hides your login credentials from view. Enabling this option does not automatically log you in when you manually navigate to the site. The login fields show the Webroot icon to indicate that the site is saved with Webroot, but you must click the site's sign-in button to log in. AutoLogin If you want to bypass the login fields and access the website automatically, select this checkbox. After you click Save, the system stores the information in a profile. The next time you access this website, make sure you are signed in to your Webroot account so the Password Manager can automatically fill in your login credentials. Defining login credentials from the SecureAnywhere website Log into my.webrootanywhere.com and click Go to Passwords.   On the far right of the panel, click Add site under "MyIdentity actions."   At the prompt, click Yes, let me manually add a site. The Add Site dialog opens.   Fill in the Add Site dialog, as described in the "Add Site Dialog" table in the previous section.   Click the Add site button. The next time you access this website, make sure you are signed in to your Webroot account so the Password Manager can automatically fill in your login credentials.
View full article
Question I have unchecked the "Scan on boot up if the computer is off at the scheduled time" option under the Scan Schedule tabs in Settings, but there is sometimes still a scan that occurs when I restart the computer.  Why is that? Answer When you uncheck the option to perform a scan on bootup if a scheduled scan is missed, WSA will forego the scan that it would have done in order to make up for any missed scheduled scan.  However, this does not preclude it running a scan at startup if it determines one needs to be run.  It could be doing so due to detecting new startup items, for instance, or other heuristic indicators that prompt it to find running a scan to be a prudent action.    There is no setting to disable scans at startup under all conditions, because that would hinder the level of protection provided by Webroot SecureAnywhere.
View full article
Question I have noticed WSA forces my NumLock into the "on" position.  I do not like this, and I don't want it to do that.  What can be done? Answer This issue is resolvable with a quick registry patch contained in this zip file.  AllowNumLock.reg will cause WSA to cease controlling the NumLock state.  Conversely, WSA_ControlNumLock.reg will cause WSA to resume control over the NumLock state.   Here is a short explanation of what to do with the zip file: 1.  Download the NumLock.zip file. 2.  Double-click NumLock.zip to open it.  It contains two .reg files. 3.  Copy the file AllowNumLock.reg to a convenient location, such as your Desktop. 4.  Double-click AllowNumLock.reg to launch it. 5.  If a User Account Control window appears, click Yes. 6.  If you receive a Registry Editor warning "Adding information can unintentionally change or delete values…", click Yes. 7.  A box indicating that the keys and values have been entered successfully appears.  Click OK. 8.  You must restart your computer for the change to take effect.  After the restart, the number pad should behave as expected.
View full article
Have you ever wondered how to use the System Cleaner feature in Webroot SecureAnywhere Essentials or Complete? Here's a video that demonstrates how:
View full article
Question Can I use one license seat for multiple virtual machines running on a single workstation? Answer Unfortunately, no.  Virtual machine installations are counted as separate seats on your license.  For instance, if you have a three seat license, and you install on two virtual machines, you have used two seats.
View full article
Question I have changed the default configuration of Webroot's firewall to "Warn if any new, untrusted process connects to the Internet."    Why doesn't the Webroot firewall block everything that connects to the internet automatically instead of allowing it after a 60 second warning? Answer Webroot learned some useful things from the 2011 version of our firewall. One of the most frequent customer support issues was people unwittingly blocking themselves from getting online altogether or blocking other important processes by using the firewall.   Having the firewall automatically block everything the user doesn't allow creates the problem that the burden of responsibility is then on the user to know exactly what every process is and does.  Most users don't know what something like "svchost" is for instance, but if you block it (which many people did on the 2011 version), you end up being unable to get online.  Any file with a relatively cryptic naming convention can generate this sort of confusion, and someone might block it by mistake.  So when the 2012 version of Webroot was being developed, it was decided that there was a better way to deal with this problem.   The firewall in its current forum will, by default, defer to the antivirus portion of the program first.  If the antivirus engine has determined an infection is present, the firewall will start warning the user about new, untrusted processes and defer to the user's judgment.  If the antivirus engine is already picking up on an infection, the decision on what to allow or block from reaching out to the internet becomes a little bit easier and more likely to result in a useful block action rather than a negative one.    Odds are though, you will never even see the firewall pop-up because the antivirus engine will have already quarantined the file trying to get to the internet.  So while the protection is there, it's now prioritized behind the antivirus engine instead of in front of it.  This results in an overall more effective program and a better user experience.
View full article
Question I am missing my search annotations in my search engine results.  Why don't I see the icons for which links are safe? Answer It is normal for Webroot search annotations to be disabled on systems that: 1. Have another search page annotation system running. 2. Connect to the internet via a HughesNet satellite connection. 3. Connect to the internet via a proxy server. Also, please keep in mind that search annotations are not available for secure Google searches (HTTPS). If you are logged into a Google account and are therefore using Google's secure search feature, your Webroot search annotations will not appear.   You should also ensure the option for search annotations is turned on.  The setting is "Analyze search engine results and identify malicious websites before visitation," and it is located in PC Security > Shields > Web Threat Shield > Change Settings
View full article
Question When a program is marked as 'Monitor' under System Tools > System Control > Control Active Processes, what exactly is Webroot doing?  I ask because a couple of legitimate programs I use are currently labelled as such. Also, is it advisable to leave them, or can I move them to 'Allow' if I know they're legit? Answer It is fine to move them to "Allow" if you know they are legitimate.  When WSA is "Monitoring," it means that the program is still unknown. It is being analyzed and journaled, and if the process/program causes harm to the PC it will be able to revert the damage done.   The status should automatically switch to "Allow" after the program found to be legitimate, and in some cases there are processes/programs that are being "Monitored" that should be accepted by WSA which may need to be Whitelisted.  If you are confident that such a program should be allowed, you can do this yourself.  If you would rather support take a look at it for you, you can open a ticket here.
View full article
Question I have Webroot SecureAnywhere Essentials or Complete.  I normally have a padlock icon on my Webroot system tray icon if I am browsing the internet, but sometimes it isn't there when I'm browsing HTTPS sites.  Am I still protected? Answer This is usually a cosmetic issue.  Typically the shield itself is actually working fine but the icon is not showing up properly in the system tray.   If you would like to test the Identity shield, the testing program available at the following website can test whether or not the shield is working:  http://www.zemana.com/anti-keylogger.aspx As long as it's working, you will see that on HTTPS sites your keystrokes are not logged and screen grabs do not show anything.   In the event it turns out to be more than a cosmetic issue in your case, you should open a support ticket here.
View full article
Question Why doesn’t SecureAnywhere find cookies anymore like the previous version did? Answer This has been something that has come up from some customers so we're adding this to our Tribal Knowledge Base.   Webroot SecureAnywhere has been completely rebuilt from the ground-up and instead of using the traditional method of having to download definition files, SecureAnywhere uses a combination of our cloud database and behavioral file analysis to keep your computer protected against the latest threats, in real-time. If a Cookie or any other file was behaving strangely, SecureAnywhere would monitor the file and determine if it is a threat.   This change was made because our insight into how to treat them has evolved since they were introduced.  Cookies are designed to provide a service that many internet users find beneficial by delivering directly to you specific information based on your preferences. For instance, if you make frequent purchases from an online store, you might see an advertisement for a sale at that store when browsing other pages.   All of the latest browsers enable you to easily manage your own cookie settings; you can delete and altogether block cookies if you’re concerned about tracking.   Each browser has slightly different instructions on how to set these configurations.  To find out more, we recommend consulting the Help documentation available for each of your browsers.   For too long, the security industry – including Webroot – has expected our customers to manage security products for themselves.  Quarantining relatively harmless cookies and expecting you to know how to handle them was part of this burden.  Just as Webroot SecureAnywhere no longer requires you to repeatedly download resource-intensive signature files, we’re no longer asking you to worry about non-malicious files like cookies.
View full article