Hack your Android like a pro: Rooting and ROMs explained

  • 19 April 2013
  • 7 replies
  • 646 views

Userlevel 7
[For all of the flexibility and customization that comes with an Android device, there are still plenty of restrictions in place. While Android technically is an open-source platform, the final product is still the result of a phone-maker's skin, the carrier or manufacturer's preloaded software, or even sometimes, a few disabled features. There isn't anything wrong with most out-of-the-box experiences, but more daring and tech-savvy users who tire of being at the mercy and discretion of carriers and handset makers might be interested in pushing their Android devices to new limits. This is where the practice known as rooting comes into play.]

 

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7 replies

Userlevel 7
I would like to underline XDA developers site mentioned in the article, if you want to learn something about rooting, you should go there. There are concentrated all wise brains already for ages. If rooting, XDA developers only! There is nothing better out there. Don't waste your time with other sites.
Userlevel 7
Thanks for pointing that out Petr.:)
Userlevel 7
You're welcome :D I am a registred user there and I got learned a lot of things about rooting, S-OFF, S-ON etc. etc. You can also download hundreds of custom ROMs. It's an amazing site.
Userlevel 7
Oh I see. I'll try to register right away.:)
Userlevel 7
While discussing rooting and how to root a device is ok to do on the Community, it's important to note that if you root your device, it cannot be supported by Webroot Support.  It will probably also void the warranty of the device itself (check with your carrier or phone manufacturer).  There is too much potential for a user to manually change administrative settings that should never be changed or otherwise cause harm to the device once it has been rooted.



That is not to say WSA will not run on a rooted device - I've rooted at least four devices on which it still runs great.



But from the perspective of being able to troubleshoot problems, it becomes exponentially more difficult since any possible problems could be occurring for all kinds of non-standard reasons once a device has been opened up for administrative tinkering.  There is more on this in Ask Webroot if you query "rooted."
Userlevel 7
Ah thanks a lot for pointing that out Jim.:) It's very important. I myself find rooting a device interesting but not sure if I'm gonna ever do it.
Userlevel 7
Thanks Jim for your notice. Very valid point. WSA users should be aware of it before they decide to root a device.

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