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What is 844 757 8828 Webroot Customer Service Number my Facebook Got Hacked from my Iphone 6s

  • 11 May 2017
  • 2 replies
  • 2056 views

I noticed that i installed webroot for my iphone 6s and after installing it after few days i see some one has access to my facebook account they created 2 more accounts and now they are contacting my friends and family for money on the name of diability i am very pissed off with Facebook Customer Service Number and Webroot Customer service Number because some is using my identity and they are making my friends a fool . i also tried to contact 844 672 9115 facebook PHone Number for technical issues but they told me my security on phone was the main issue so i told them i bought webroot which i think has best reviews in market so i contact webroot customer service on the number given above they  put me hold and my call got disconnected i have not heard back from Webroot Billing team or Webroot Customer service phone number.
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Best answer by Petrovic 11 May 2017, 09:31

Hello
 
This is a scam
 
The best thing to do is to submit a Trouble Ticket or contact support and ask Webroot Support to take a look  these for you.  There is NO CHARGE for this for valid WSA license holder
 
"
If you clicked anything links, allowed them to remote into your computer, or went to any web sites please submit a Trouble TicketASAP. (Now would be a good idea....)
 
If you would like more information, read on (After submitting that Trouble Ticket.....)
 
NEWS ARTICLE: Tech Support Scams are on the rise.
 
 
Microsoft never issues this type of warning or email or anything of a sort! Please see the following link for Microsofts official word on this:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
 
"Neither Microsoft nor our partners make unsolicited phone calls (also known as cold calls) to charge you for computer security or software fixes.
 
Cybercriminals often use publicly available phone directories so they might know your name and other personal information when they call you. They might even guess what operating system you're using.
 
Once they've gained your trust, they might ask for your user name and password or ask you to go to a website to install software that will let them access your computer to fix it. Once you do this, your computer and your personal information is vulnerable."
 
Also see Avoid scams that use the Microsoft name fraudulently
http://www.microsoft.com/security/online-privacy/msname.aspx
 
 
For more information here iwhat the United States Federal Trade Commission has to say on the subject::
http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0346-tech-support-scams
 
"In a recent twist, scam artists are using the phone to try to break into your computer. They call, claiming to be computer techs associated with well-known companies like Microsoft. They say that they’ve detected viruses or other malware on your computer to trick you into giving them remote access or paying for software you don’t need.
 
These scammers take advantage of your reasonable concerns about viruses and other threats. They know that computer users have heard time and again that it’s important to install security software. But the purpose behind their elaborate scheme isn’t to protect your computer; it’s to make money."
 
This scam is common and has been around for quite a while. Here is a good Webroot Blog article from April 2013 by Threat Researcher Roy Tobin.
http://www.webroot.com/blog/2013/04/30/fake-microsoft-security-scam/ "
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Userlevel 7
Badge +51
Hello
 
This is a scam
 
The best thing to do is to submit a Trouble Ticket or contact support and ask Webroot Support to take a look  these for you.  There is NO CHARGE for this for valid WSA license holder
 
"
If you clicked anything links, allowed them to remote into your computer, or went to any web sites please submit a Trouble TicketASAP. (Now would be a good idea....)
 
If you would like more information, read on (After submitting that Trouble Ticket.....)
 
NEWS ARTICLE: Tech Support Scams are on the rise.
 
 
Microsoft never issues this type of warning or email or anything of a sort! Please see the following link for Microsofts official word on this:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
 
"Neither Microsoft nor our partners make unsolicited phone calls (also known as cold calls) to charge you for computer security or software fixes.
 
Cybercriminals often use publicly available phone directories so they might know your name and other personal information when they call you. They might even guess what operating system you're using.
 
Once they've gained your trust, they might ask for your user name and password or ask you to go to a website to install software that will let them access your computer to fix it. Once you do this, your computer and your personal information is vulnerable."
 
Also see Avoid scams that use the Microsoft name fraudulently
http://www.microsoft.com/security/online-privacy/msname.aspx
 
 
For more information here iwhat the United States Federal Trade Commission has to say on the subject::
http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0346-tech-support-scams
 
"In a recent twist, scam artists are using the phone to try to break into your computer. They call, claiming to be computer techs associated with well-known companies like Microsoft. They say that they’ve detected viruses or other malware on your computer to trick you into giving them remote access or paying for software you don’t need.
 
These scammers take advantage of your reasonable concerns about viruses and other threats. They know that computer users have heard time and again that it’s important to install security software. But the purpose behind their elaborate scheme isn’t to protect your computer; it’s to make money."
 
This scam is common and has been around for quite a while. Here is a good Webroot Blog article from April 2013 by Threat Researcher Roy Tobin.
http://www.webroot.com/blog/2013/04/30/fake-microsoft-security-scam/ "
Userlevel 7
Excellent and informative post, Petr! :cattongue:
 

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