What reasons influenced you the most to make you choose Webroot?


Userlevel 4
What are the reasons that influenced you the most to make you choose Webroot considering how many Cyber Security Products there are to choose from these days?  Also do you like using WSA by itself, or do you like using it with other Security Products?  If you are using WSA with other Security Products then which products do you prefer to use with WSA to make up your Layered Security Setup?  Also, how long have you been using Prevx / WSA? 

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@DavidP wrote:

@TripleHelix wrote:

@DavidP wrote:
I think Daniel is a lot like me... very hard to offend but also a bit of sarcastic humor that doesn't always come out reading it in text the way it is meant: in good humor :)

Yea most times I got to get the pest spray out and use it on David.

      


 
Daniel :D

SOMETIMES?!?!?!?!?  Almost daily!  :)
 
Of course that IS my own fault... I AM a pest at times :)

But a great friend and a nice pest! We are getting alittle

again. LOL
 
Daniel
Userlevel 7

@TripleHelix wrote:

@DavidP wrote:
I think Daniel is a lot like me... very hard to offend but also a bit of sarcastic humor that doesn't always come out reading it in text the way it is meant: in good humor :)

Yea most times I got to get the pest spray out and use it on David.

      


 
Daniel :D

SOMETIMES?!?!?!?!?  Almost daily!  :)
 
Of course that IS my own fault... I AM a pest at times :)
Userlevel 7
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@DavidP wrote:
I think Daniel is a lot like me... very hard to offend but also a bit of sarcastic humor that doesn't always come out reading it in text the way it is meant: in good humor :)

Yea most times I got to get the pest spray out and use it on David.

      


 
Daniel :D
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I think Daniel is a lot like me... very hard to offend but also a bit of sarcastic humor that doesn't always come out reading it in text the way it is meant: in good humor 🙂
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@AnorexicHippo wrote:

@TripleHelix wrote:
I got it that's why I said Details, Details and I was half asleep late at night. :D
 
Thanks,
 
Daniel ;)

Hey Daniel

I believe you are a great guy and I never meant to offend you, it's just that when I see something that I don't think is right I tend to keep at it until I figure it out. Again , I apologize if I offended you.

You never did so no worries just enjoy my funny quirks at times and enjoy the forums. ;)
 
Cheers,
 
Daniel


Userlevel 2

@TripleHelix wrote:
I got it that's why I said Details, Details and I was half asleep late at night. :D
 
Thanks,
 
Daniel ;)

Hey Daniel

I believe you are a great guy and I never meant to offend you, it's just that when I see something that I don't think is right I tend to keep at it until I figure it out. Again , I apologize if I offended you.
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I got it that's why I said Details, Details and I was half asleep late at night. :D
 
Thanks,
 
Daniel ;)
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@TripleHelix wrote:

@AnorexicHippo wrote:
@TripleHelix wrote:
3 Priceless Combinations! Webroot (Spysweeper) and Webroot (Prevx) and Webroot (Bright Cloud) The End....
 
 
Those are not 3 combinations, they are 3 separate apps that, when used together, constitute 1 combination. I am just an old fool and I don't know anything about Bright Cloud, but I thought Spysweeper had been replaced by WSA..Spysweeper

Details, Details 😃 Webroot owns all three and Spyseeper's detections have been added to the Webroot (Prevx) Cloud database, Bright Cloud will be more integrated into WSA in the new Web Threat Shield for 2014 product line so 3 Priceless Combinations in one product Webroot SecureAnywhere.
 
Daniel  ;)

 Thanks for your reply Daniel, but you still don't appear to understand the meaning of the word combination. You have listed 3 separate apps and you consider each one of them to be a combination, how is that possible?
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@cloud wrote:
Yeah, but that doesn't really set it to FULL MAX IIRC. I still have all those other options and I still must fiddle with them because they're there, you see.

Sure if you want to but default is always recommend and I have mine tweaked to the Max without extra pop-ups.
 
Daniel ;)
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@AnorexicHippo wrote:
@TripleHelix wrote:
3 Priceless Combinations! Webroot (Spysweeper) and Webroot (Prevx) and Webroot (Bright Cloud) The End....
 
 
Those are not 3 combinations, they are 3 separate apps that, when used together, constitute 1 combination. I am just an old fool and I don't know anything about Bright Cloud, but I thought Spysweeper had been replaced by WSA..Spysweeper

Details, Details 😃 Webroot owns all three and Spyseeper's detections have been added to the Webroot (Prevx) Cloud database, Bright Cloud will be more integrated into WSA in the new Web Threat Shield for 2014 product line so 3 Priceless Combinations in one product Webroot SecureAnywhere.
 
Daniel  ;)
Userlevel 2
TripleHelix wrote:
3 Priceless Combinations! Webroot (Spysweeper) and Webroot (Prevx) and Webroot (Bright Cloud) The End....
 
 
Those are not 3 combinations, they are 3 separate apps that, when used together, constitute 1 combination. I am just an old fool and I don't know anything about Bright Cloud, but I thought Spysweeper had been replaced by WSA..Spysweeper
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Yeah, but that doesn't really set it to FULL MAX IIRC. I still have all those other options and I still must fiddle with them because they're there, you see.
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So what influenced me to choose Webroot does everyone have all night? Prevx user since 2004 and my good friend  the Lead Developer then Webroot acquired Prevx and my good friend the V.P. of Development now in Nov 2010. It just plainly works it feels like Prevx it scans like Prevx (fast) and the same great support so what else can I say? Webroot was very, very smart to acquired Prevx and most of there Staff are now and continue to be Webroot Staff.
3 Priceless Combinations! Webroot (Spysweeper) and Webroot (Prevx) and Webroot (Bright Cloud) The End....


 
Daniel :)
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@cloud wrote:
It seemed lighter and easier to deal with than other AV's. So quick and easy. It'd be nice if they'd get rid of all the options and just have modes. Like lock down (Locks down the whole PC to provide absolute max security but still leaves the PC usable even if a little inconvenient) High Medium (normal) and Low if for whatever reason you want Low.

They did make it easier in 2013 they added this page it wasn't in the 2012 version.


 
Daniel
 


Userlevel 2
It seemed lighter and easier to deal with than other AV's. So quick and easy. It'd be nice if they'd get rid of all the options and just have modes. Like lock down (Locks down the whole PC to provide absolute max security but still leaves the PC usable even if a little inconvenient) High Medium (normal) and Low if for whatever reason you want Low.
Userlevel 7
Hello Replay and welcome to the Community!
 
Glad to have you here, and remember if you do  you have any issues or problems, please let us know!
These are the reasons for I decided to run WSA on all my PC's:
 
1. the lightest AV in the world
2. the fastest scan; a full pc scan is done in less than 30 sec!!!!
3. with WSA I have everything; antivirus, antimalware; firewall, privacy
4. best suport in the world! If something goes wrong a technician will search your PC to be sure that you are on the right path
5. WSA is there for you, WSA just knows!!!
Userlevel 2


One of the things that convinced me to give WSA a try was my familiarity with prevx, I knew about prevx for years before Webroot bought them out and I thought it was a great app. I could go on and on but I will try to boil it down to a few salient points:

1 WSA is one of the lightest apps on this planet. What other anti malware app have you ever heard of that, after installation, takes up less than 1 MB on the hard drive?

2 WSA has been designed to maximize compatibility with other security software. You don't have to run it alongside a traditional AV, but you can if you want to.

3 As with any good AV, there are plenty of configuration options.

4 RAM usage is so minimal I hesitated to mention it.

5 Customer support that is second to none, if you get infected while running WSA, Webroot will help you remove the malware, free of charge.

6 My PC is clean, and WSA excels at keeping a clean PC clean.

An Excellent Choice
Webroot SecureAnywhere AntiVirus 2013 gives you speedy scanning and excellent malware blocking in a ridiculously small package. The whole product would fit on a 3.5" diskette, if you could find one. Its detection technology differs greatly from virtually all the competition, but it sure seems to work.

The above was stolen from this review: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2410545,00.asp
 
I do not intend to imply that WSA is perfect, because it is not, I have had some problems with the web threat shield and I don't believe it is fully compatible with Firefox, but overall I think WSA is a fine program and I still intend to purchase it when my trial is over.
Userlevel 7
The answer to both questions is no.  Though I have to give a nod to Explanoit's answer as well.

The way the data is stored would make it impossible to say, for instance, make a query to the database asking "What are the IP addresses or any other identifying factors for all PC's on which a file with this MD5 hash was run?"

If a user contacts us via support, the support system can identify that a certain list of executable files exists on a particular computer (only executables - not pictures, music files, etc), which is good data to have when troubleshooting.  However, that's a very limited, computer-specific set of information.  As for IP address, every site you visit on the internet can see it because that's how the internet works to be able to show you any information you want to look at.  It's like your home address for snail mail.  You can't get snail mail unless the sender knows the address.  The fact that Webroot knows your IP address is by no means mysterious.  You freely offer it anywhere you choose to go on the internet.  You could, of course, use a proxy or a VPN to hide it if you so choose, and then we'd just have a fake IP address.  If you want to do that, we allow for it in WSA with a proxy settings feature that will let you anonymize yourself as you see fit.

The back end systems have information about particular files and we do store the number of computers on which a file was seen, but they don't store a specific list of all computers from which a file was seen.  So such a query could not be run.  It's just file info about the executable files being queried - not a big list of all of the computers we've ever seen and everything on them.

Hypothetically speaking (and I have to say hypothetically because I'm not aware of any situation in which this has ever actually happened), if law enforcement found some reason to obtain the necessary legal standing to demand assistance with something, it would need to be, firstly, related to an executable file, because WSA doesn't care about any file that doesn't execute and doesn't log anything to do with non-executing files.  Secondly, they would have to know the user uses Webroot.  Thirdly, they would need to provide the user's email address or keycode in order for us to even know who we'd be looking for in our systems.

You can see the log in question for yourself by going to Reports and using Save Log.  As you can see there, it has a list of executable files and their cloud-based determination status (G, B, U, etc).  

So how could this information ever be useful to law enforcement?  They'd have to be looking for a Webroot user they can already identify who is running some kind of executable file that is somehow illegal in and of itself without even being run.  Keep in mind, the fact that a file appears in Webroot's log doesn't mean it was ever run, intentionally downloaded, or ever even presented itself to the user in any way.  In fact, if it's a malicious executable file, Webroot would quarantine it before it can even be run, even if a user tries to run it on purpose.  A log of a file existing is no evidence at all that the file was ever run.  In fact, it may very well serve only to show the file was blocked and never even run on the computer.  So this "law enforcement scenario" just doesn't stack up.

Other question:
It's impossible to "gain access to a computer" via WSA or any of Webroot's other technology.  Even when Support connects to a computer to troubleshoot, it's using LogMeIn.  More generally, is it possible any piece of technology could be hacked?  Basically, yes, always, and there are no exceptions to that, given enough time, resources, skills, and social engineering efforts.  That's a big part of why security services like Webroot exist and why we do everything right to ensure our systems don't get hacked.  They never have been to date, and we keep on top of everything to ensure they never are.
 
Ah, you edited your comment to add more.  Lucky for me I refreshed before posting.  ;)
So, yes, cloud storage poses some different concerns.  I'd suggest if you're doing something illegal that merits a warrant being served against you, you'd probably be wise not to back it up at all, with any service, ever.  Or maybe just don't do stuff that's illegal.
 
And of course it's true that black hat hackers will always try to hack valuable targets.  Again, I'd make the point that we haven't ever been successfully hacked, so we do fit the bill of having the good history of keeping our clients' accounts and data secure.
 
So, back on topic, what made you choose Webroot @newuser ?
(By the way, this is a fun discussion, but if it's going to keep up would you mind making a new topic please, so as not to derail this one?  Thanks :))
Well, thanks!
 
The whole idea is why use something which can facilitate loss of privacy when you can use something else?
 
In theory, can the cloud be hacked without Webroot knowledge?The cloud is a very important centralized source of information, rather than hacking 1000000 pc's is more efficient to hack the cloud to get access to all 1000000 pc's.
 
So, in theory is this possible?
 
see this:http://computer.howstuffworks.com/cloud-computing/files-safe-in-the-cloud.htm
 
 
  • Hackers usually want the most information for the least effort. This means they will likely attack the heart of a cloud storage service rather than its individual users. Thus, you probably want to find a service provider with a good history of keeping its clients' accounts and data secure.
  • Your data isn't always immune to search and seizure by local government entities. In the U.S., for example, any cloud storage company could be served a subpoena requiring them to open their clients' data for government examination.
Userlevel 7
Even if Webroot doesn't keep that information, they could easily modify the backend to log it all with the request of a government. Any cloud-enabled AV that checks in about MD5s (which is most of them) makes that possible. But getting a list of all the computers that run Microsoft Word doesn't really help the government. MD5s don't give you content.
 
If a company can run executable code on your computer with an update mechanism there's no limit to what can be done, in theory. If you're going up against the government, you really shouldn't be using cloud-anything. You shouldn't even be using Windows.
 
In the end you just have to accept you're not that interesting, and that if you are then you should be a lot more careful about your information security practices. Like using throw-away laptops running Linux in a RAMdisk that routes everything through Tor.
 
If you consider a government tyrannical and all-powerful and coming after you - then yes, Webroot SecureAnywhere probably isn't the product for you. Which is just one in a long-line of products not for you. :cathappy:
Hi JimM,
 
So, if Webroot is asked by an enforcing entity to identify a file on a certain PC, is it possible or not?
 
For example , an enforcing agency will ask Webroot to provide a list of all IP/ users who have the file  abc.exe on their computers.
 
Is this possible or not?
Userlevel 7
I think you mean Neil Rubenking. That article is actually a great read. It goes a long way towards explaining some possible misconceptions surrounding third party testing.

The post that was removed was removed because the user in question was banned for repeatedly breaking the community guidelines. Hopefully any future posts in this thread will stay on topic, remain civil, and not exist solely for the purpose of creating a disturbance. 🙂
I found the article:
 
http://securitywatch.pcmag.com/security-software/291874-webroot-accused-exonerated
 
 
"In most cases I install the antivirus software using a registration key supplied by the vendor. There's plenty of opportunity to identify my testbed "
I would be interested to hear your comments about the previous post (deleted) ; was something about Neil Rubick??? saing that webroot can identify a pc based on activation code and IP.
 
Thank you!

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