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How do I shut down Webroot for more than one reboot?

  • 14 March 2017
  • 5 replies
  • 78 views

Hi - I'm running Endpoint Protection 9.0.15.50 on a windows 7 pro machine. Trying to upgrade to Win10, which requires multiple reboots. Upgrade fails when Endpoint comes back on after the first reboot - at least that appears to be the issue. I'd like to test it by disabling Webroot until I manually re-enable it. 

 

Is there a way to disable protection indefinitely or for some fixed period of time rather than "until the next reboot"?

 

Thanks!
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Best answer by jhartnerd123 15 March 2017, 19:40

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Userlevel 7
Badge +30
Hey @,

 

Currently no, there's no way to shut the protection down for more than a reboot. 

 

If you are doing an OS upgrade, the recommended thing to do is simply uninstall the agent, perform the upgrade, then reinstall the agent afterwards. 

 

If using the business version of endpoint, simply go to your console, under group managment tab find your system hostname and under agent commands, agent, select uninstall. Then locally, right click the agent in the system tray and select Refresh Configuration to force the agent to poll the cloud and retrieve the uninstall command. Wait for the program to remove itself and continue to perform your OS upgrade. 

 

Also, if you do upgrade from 7-10, 8/8.1-10 or 10-10 anniversary edition with the agent installed, there's a chance you'll get a duplicate entry show in your console. So following the above recommendation is best. 

 

Hope this helps



John Hart
Userlevel 7
Hello @ and welcome to our Community.



After checking with our Team,@jartnerd123 is indeed correct that uninstalling the agent is the easiest way to complete your upgrade.



Sincere apologies for the inconvenience.



Best,
Thank you! I appreciate the help.
1 1/2 years later...Is uninstalling still the only way to shut off Webroot when installing a new/upgrade OS having multiple reboots?

 

Thanks!
Badge +5
I think Uninstalling is for the best. The less things in general Windows has to "port" over during an upgrade, the better.

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